Drowning Statistics

Drowning – die through in and inhalation of water
 

Drowning Statistics

  • from 2005 to 2014, there are about 10 deaths per day due to drownings
  • about 1 in 5 people who die from drowning are children under the age of 14
  • 350 under the age of 5 drown in pools nationwide
  • the majority of drownings occur in June, July and August mostly in backyard pools
  • drowning is the 2nd leading cause of death under the age of 5

  • In California, Florida and Arizona, drowning is the leading cause of accidental death under the age of 5

 

  • another 2,600 are treated in the ER each year for near-drowning deaths
  • in Florida, drowning is the leading cause of death in ages 1 to 4
  • Florida has the highest death rate for drowning in the nation 
  • enough children die from drowning each year in Florida to fill 3 to 4 preschool classrooms
 
Most accidents happen quickly.  A child can drown as quickly as it takes answering the telephone.  Seconds count!  Restart the breathing process even while still in the water.  Remember that child drowning is a silent killer.  There is no splashing to alert anyone that the child is in trouble.  What can you do to be prepared?
GET CPR CERTIFIED!
 
 
 
Source:
 

BLS Fact of the Week

According to the American Heart Association, as soon as the unresponsive victim is removed from the water, the rescuer should open the airway, check for breathing, and if there is no breathing, give 2 rescue breaths that make the chest rise (if this was not done in the water). After delivery of 2 effective breaths, the lay rescuer should immediately begin chest compressions and provide cycles of compressions and ventilations. The healthcare provider should check for a central pulse. The pulse may be difficult to appreciate in a drowning victim, particularly if the victim is cold. If the healthcare provider does not definitely feel a pulse within 10 seconds, the healthcare provider should start cycles of compressions and ventilations. Only trained rescuers should try to provide chest compressions in the water.
Once the victim is out of the water, if the victim is unresponsive and not breathing (and the healthcare provider does not feel a pulse) after delivery of 2 rescue breaths, rescuers should attach an AED and attempt defibrillation if a shockable rhythm is identified.

ACLS Fact of the Week

According to the American Heart Association, the drowning victim in cardiac arrest requires ACLS, including early intubation. Every drowning victim, even one who requires only minimal resuscitation before recovery, requires monitored transport and evaluation at a medical facility.
Victims in cardiac arrest may present with asystole, pulseless electrical activity, or pulseless ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (VF). Follow the guidelines for pediatric advanced life support and ACLS for treatment of these rhythms.

Class Schedule

 

6/19/2017 @ 6:00 pm

BLS Provider

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6/21/2017 @ 2:00 pm

BLS Provider

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6/21/2017 @ 4:00 pm

HeartSaver CPR / AED

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6/22/2017 @ 10:00 am

BLS Provider

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6/23/2017 @ 10:00 am

BLS Provider

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6/23/2017 @ 10:00 am

Airway Management Course

6/23/2017 @ 2:00 pm

BLS Provider

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6/23/2017 @ 2:00 pm

BLS Provider Skills Session

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6/23/2017 @ 4:00 pm

ACLS Skills Session

 

6/24/2017 @ 9:00 am

BLS Provider

 

6/24/2017 @ 9:00 am

BLS Provider Skills Session

6/24/2017 @ 11:00 am

HeartSaver CPR / AED

We also offer onsite training.  Please call us today to schedule!

Chris – 239-292-4225

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Class Schedule is subject to change.

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